Halloween 2017: How Much Does the Average American Spend?

Halloween’s a holiday full of scares and surprises, but the biggest one of all could be the sticker shock that comes when you add up how much you’ve spent for the holiday.

A pair of new studies finds that average per person Halloween spending ranges from $169 to $183. To put it another way, if you were to boycott All Hallows’ Eve throughout your life, you could save nearly $12,000 by the time you turned 65. And that’s not even including the cavities from all the candy you’d consume.

Read more at Fortune.com: Halloween 2017: How Much Does the Average American Spend?

Samuel Adams Releases Utopias 2017, a $200, High Alcohol Beer

Every two years, the brewers at Samuel Adams like to create an event—and there’s no easier way to stir the passions of beer lovers than the release of Utopias.

The biennial release, which carries a price tag of $199 and an ABV of a whopping 28%, is one of the beer world’s most highly anticipated events. Just 13,000 bottles of the beer will be distributed throughout the U.S., though not in 12 states, where it’s illegal to sell.

Read more at Fortune.com: Samuel Adams Releases Utopias 2017, a $200, High Alcohol Beer

Great American Beer Festival: 5 Brewers on the Cusp of Craft Beer Fame

When it comes to beer, there are many levels of fame. Anheuser Busch InBev and MillerCoors earned theirs by the size of their market domination. Brewers like Lagunitas and Samuel Adams helped spark a revolution. And names like Russian River (creator of Pliny the Elder), The Alchemist (Hedy Topper) and Trillium (who jump started the New England IPA style) have earned national reputations from the word-of-mouth acclaim of beer drinkers.

This last measure of fame is a particular favorite of craft brewers. It’s authentic and not something that can be achieved with clever marketing or distribution tricks. And at the Great American Beer Festival, currently taking place in Denver, brewers are hoping to capture or stoke that spark to take them to the next level.

Read more at Fortune.com: Great American Beer Festival: 5 Brewers on the Cusp of Craft Beer Fame

Sexually Charged Resorts Are Hot Vacation Destinations

Aside from an occasional towel, you’ll be hard pressed to find a stitch of fabric on the hundreds of people lounging in and by the pool at this Jamaican resort. For the most part, people congregate in groups in the water or the swim-up bar, chit-chatting and swapping stories as any vacationers might, though perhaps with a bit more revelry and boisterousness.

Off to the side, though, it’s not entirely uncommon to see a couple—or sometimes a group—engage in behavior that’s…a bit more intimate. And no one around them tends to bat an eye. It’s just another day at Hedonism II.

Read more at Fortune.com: Sexually Charged Resorts Are Hot Vacation Destinations

Donald Trump’s War with the NFL Goes back 40 years


Donald Trump’s attack on the National Football League Friday might have seem to come out of nowhere to some fans, but in reality, his disgruntlement with the NFL has a long history.

Trump, in a three-minute tirade, encouraged owners to fire players who kneel during the U.S. national anthem. The comments resulted in dozens of additional players taking a knee during the anthem, a closing of the ranks among NFL owners to stand against Trump’s remarks, and some teams not coming out onto the field for the anthem at all.

Read more at Fortune.com: Donald Trump’s War with the NFL Goes back 40 years

Hugh Hefner Death: An End For The Playboy Mansion Too

The passing of Playboy founder Hugh Hefner marks not only the end of an era in the world of publishing, it’s also the end for one of the most famous pieces of real estate in the country.

The Playboy Mansion is now completely out of the hands of the Hefner family. Neighbor Daren Metropoulos bought the estate last August for $100 million—with the stipulation that Hefner would be allowed to live there for the rest of his life.

Read more at Fortune.com: Hugh Hefner Death: An End For The Playboy Mansion Too

Child Writes Adorable Letter to Toys ‘R’ Us Bankruptcy Judge

As he oversees the bankruptcy case of Toys ‘R’ Us, judge Keith Phillips in the Eastern District of Virginia is getting a lot of paperwork, but none of the filings are likely to be as memorable as a recent note he received from a 9-year-old.

The letter, which was entered into the bankruptcy docket on Monday, is from a boy named Andrew (his last name was redacted). In it, he argues to the court that the closure of Toys ‘R’ Us would be “bad for kids,” backing up his claim with three pretty solid reasons.

Read more at Fortune.com: Toys R Us Bankruptcy: Child Asks Judge to Not Close Stores

Ubisoft’s CEO Isn’t Playing Games

With hits like Assassin’s Creed, Raving Rabbids, and Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six, Ubisoft has become one of the world’s biggest video game makers with nearly $1.7 billion in annual revenue. But sometimes, success comes with a price.

For the better part of the past two years, the company has had to deal with a looming takeover threat from French media conglomerate Vivendi, which has slowly been buying shares of the game publisher. As of mid-August, it held a 27% stake.

Read more at Fortune: Ubisoft’s CEO Isn’t Playing Games

For sale: The Clampett Mansion from The Beverly Hillbillies

Jed Clampett may have made his first fortune in oil, but he’s about to find that real estate is where the real money’s at.

The house that was featured as the setting for The Beverly Hillbillies is up for sale—and it’s boasting the most expensive real estate price tag in the country: $350 million.

Read more at Fortune: For sale: The Clampett Mansion from The Beverly Hillbillies