Streaming Could Change the Video Game Business Forever

In the beginning, there were video game stores. There were bricks, and there was mortar, and hours before the stroke of midnight of a highly anticipated release, there were snaking lines of customers outside GameStop or Toys “R” Us or Best Buy, waiting with excitement for the sale to begin. This was the first age of video games, and it was good.

Source: Streaming Could Change the Video Game Business Forever

Call ‘Em the Dirty Dozen: The 12 Most Popular Porn Stars of 2018

Fame in the adult entertainment industry is a fickle thing. Many performers leave the industry before anyone knows their name. Some experience a meteoric rise, only to fall in the course of a few months. Others prove eternal.

The adult entertainment industry’s annual exposition runs from Jan. 24 to 27 in Las Vegas. Ahead of the event, here is a list of this year’s most popular porn stars as judged by their standing among industry insiders and depth of fan interest, a critical factor to success in the industry.

Read more at Fortune.com

Super Mario Odyssey could make Nintendo’s Switch even harder to find this holiday

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At any point in any console cycle, the launch of a new Super Mario game is a big deal. But “Super Mario Odyssey,” which hits store shelves today, is a bonafide event.

The game is garnering some of the best review of any game this year. And consumer interest in those reviews is so strong that the servers for Metacritic, which acts as a clearinghouse for reviews, were unable to keep up with site traffic on Thursday.

Read more at CNBC.com: Super Mario Odyssey hits stores

Halloween 2017: How Much Does the Average American Spend?

Halloween’s a holiday full of scares and surprises, but the biggest one of all could be the sticker shock that comes when you add up how much you’ve spent for the holiday.

A pair of new studies finds that average per person Halloween spending ranges from $169 to $183. To put it another way, if you were to boycott All Hallows’ Eve throughout your life, you could save nearly $12,000 by the time you turned 65. And that’s not even including the cavities from all the candy you’d consume.

Read more at Fortune.com: Halloween 2017: How Much Does the Average American Spend?

Samuel Adams Releases Utopias 2017, a $200, High Alcohol Beer

Every two years, the brewers at Samuel Adams like to create an event—and there’s no easier way to stir the passions of beer lovers than the release of Utopias.

The biennial release, which carries a price tag of $199 and an ABV of a whopping 28%, is one of the beer world’s most highly anticipated events. Just 13,000 bottles of the beer will be distributed throughout the U.S., though not in 12 states, where it’s illegal to sell.

Read more at Fortune.com: Samuel Adams Releases Utopias 2017, a $200, High Alcohol Beer

Great American Beer Festival: 5 Brewers on the Cusp of Craft Beer Fame

When it comes to beer, there are many levels of fame. Anheuser Busch InBev and MillerCoors earned theirs by the size of their market domination. Brewers like Lagunitas and Samuel Adams helped spark a revolution. And names like Russian River (creator of Pliny the Elder), The Alchemist (Hedy Topper) and Trillium (who jump started the New England IPA style) have earned national reputations from the word-of-mouth acclaim of beer drinkers.

This last measure of fame is a particular favorite of craft brewers. It’s authentic and not something that can be achieved with clever marketing or distribution tricks. And at the Great American Beer Festival, currently taking place in Denver, brewers are hoping to capture or stoke that spark to take them to the next level.

Read more at Fortune.com: Great American Beer Festival: 5 Brewers on the Cusp of Craft Beer Fame

Sexually Charged Resorts Are Hot Vacation Destinations

Aside from an occasional towel, you’ll be hard pressed to find a stitch of fabric on the hundreds of people lounging in and by the pool at this Jamaican resort. For the most part, people congregate in groups in the water or the swim-up bar, chit-chatting and swapping stories as any vacationers might, though perhaps with a bit more revelry and boisterousness.

Off to the side, though, it’s not entirely uncommon to see a couple—or sometimes a group—engage in behavior that’s…a bit more intimate. And no one around them tends to bat an eye. It’s just another day at Hedonism II.

Read more at Fortune.com: Sexually Charged Resorts Are Hot Vacation Destinations

Donald Trump’s War with the NFL Goes back 40 years


Donald Trump’s attack on the National Football League Friday might have seem to come out of nowhere to some fans, but in reality, his disgruntlement with the NFL has a long history.

Trump, in a three-minute tirade, encouraged owners to fire players who kneel during the U.S. national anthem. The comments resulted in dozens of additional players taking a knee during the anthem, a closing of the ranks among NFL owners to stand against Trump’s remarks, and some teams not coming out onto the field for the anthem at all.

Read more at Fortune.com: Donald Trump’s War with the NFL Goes back 40 years

Hugh Hefner Death: An End For The Playboy Mansion Too

The passing of Playboy founder Hugh Hefner marks not only the end of an era in the world of publishing, it’s also the end for one of the most famous pieces of real estate in the country.

The Playboy Mansion is now completely out of the hands of the Hefner family. Neighbor Daren Metropoulos bought the estate last August for $100 million—with the stipulation that Hefner would be allowed to live there for the rest of his life.

Read more at Fortune.com: Hugh Hefner Death: An End For The Playboy Mansion Too

Hurricane watch: 40% of small businesses don’t reopen after a disaster

One of the hard lessons many small businesses are learning after the devastating impacts of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma is that a disaster plan is essential — even if you think you’ll never need to use it.

According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), almost 40 percent of small businesses never reopen their doors after a disaster. Recent data from a CNBC/SurveyMonkey Small Business Survey also shows that most small business owners don’t spend too much time thinking about the environment as a critical factor.

Read more at CNBC.com: Hurricane watch: 40% of small businesses don’t reopen after a disaster