Oscar and Social Media: An Organic Marriage

Ellen ellen-oscar-selfieDeGeneres’ selfie was the most buzzed-about moment of last year’s Oscars — reaching a level of popularity so quickly that it managed to break Twitter. But what a lot of people don’t realize is that shot was actually the second selfie she took during the show.

For Josh Spector, managing director of digital media for the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences, the night-and-day difference between the two shots was a victory. DeGeneres taking a selfie, of course, was planned well in advance of the show’s start. But when the first one didn’t take off, Spector and his team adjusted plans for the second — and in doing so, they managed to capture lightning in a bottle.

Read more at Variety

9 ways to sidestep Facebook’s rising ad rates

It’s facebook ad ratesnot exactly a revelation that Facebook can be a powerful marketing tool for business. Sixty-two percent of the 1,000 U.S. residents recently polled by G/O Digital say they visit Facebook to learn more about small businesses. Beyond that, 30 percent of those people claimed they visit a company’s Facebook page several times before physically venturing to the business.

Finding a way to best capitalize on Facebook isn’t always easy—or cheap: The average price per Facebook ad increased 123 percent in the second quarter.

Read more at CNBC.com

Lessons learned from big social media disasters

Social lessons learned social mediamedia is an essential part of business today, but it’s one that should come with a warning label.

Interacting with customers and fans of your company can be a tremendous marketing tool. It can also be a recipe for disaster. One slipup—or, in countless cases, a social media manager accidentally tweeting to the company account instead of their own—can make companies accidental laughingstocks (like the time in 2011 when the American Red Cross Twitter feed announced “When we drink, we do it right #gettngslizzard”).

Read more at CNBC.com

Why customer service at video game companies seems so bad

Every gaming customer serviceindustry has its critics, but few are quite as vocal as an enraged video gamer whose game has just inexplicably stopped working—especially when a new console or game is involved.

With consumer expectations set high, and the demand for instant gratification pressing, irritating problems—like new games going on the fritz, or screens blacking out—can be magnified, and consumers’ tempers can be short. Customer service wait times can feel epic, and some problems never seem to get fixed.

Add the echo chamber of social media, and one can get the impression that video game companies are uniquely bad when it comes to customer service. But is that true?

Read more at CNBC.com