Porn site sues Amazon over Fire TV

The fireTV-FyreTvowners of a porn website that shares the name as Amazon’s Fire TV set-top box are turning up the heat.

Florida-based WREAL is suing Amazon for alleged trademark infringement, asking a U.S. District Court judge to force the company to change the product’s name and to hand over all profits Fire TV has generated thus far.

Read more at CNBC.com

Ultraviolet: Future hue of homevid?

After CES_cloud_640spending much of the past year educating consumers on the merits of UltraViolet, Hollywood is ready for the digital locker service to go mainstream in 2013.

Launched by a consortium of more than 70 major entertainment players, hardware manufacturers and retailers in late 2011, UltraViolet was designed to serve as a convenient way for people to store their purchased movies, TV shows and other forms of entertainment online so they could be played using various devices without worrying about formats.

Read more at Daily Variety

Video growth drives network upgrade

When the standards for local wired high-speed computing networks were first formalized in 1985, streaming media wasn’t a big concern. But as demand for those services has increased, especially in recent years, officials have begun to fear a logjam, so they have taken steps to prepare for a expected flood of streaming and downloaded multimedia in the years to come.

The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) recently upgraded Ethernet standards, increasing bandwidth speeds and preparing for new markets, including in-car networking.

Read more at Daily Variety

Google TV tries again

The first iteration of Google TV fell flat. It was, at its core, a good idea that was marred by poor execution and mismanagement. Now the search giant is ready to give it another go.

Starting Sunday, Google will roll out a software update to existing owners that’s meant to serve as a reboot of the service. The update will bring a new interface as well as selected apps from the Android Marketplace – but it will also bring a lot of baggage and hurdles from the existing service (most notably the lack of any support from the major networks).

Gamefly details new digital service

GameFly has found a fair bit of success by emulating Netflix’s old business model in the video game space. For a fixed amount per month, users can rent console games and keep them for as long as they want.

Now, the company is following in its forerunner’s footsteps once again – with plans to add a game streaming site to supplement its offerings.

Read more at Variety’s Technotainment blog

Who’s cutting the cord – and where do they live?

There’s plenty of talk about cord cutting these days – the idea that people can cancel their cable subscriptions and still view most (or all) of their favorite programming. There’s not a lot of talk, though, on where it’s taking place.

The answer, it seems, is Dallas, Texas.

Read more at Variety’s Technotainment blog

Survey: Netflix price increases could spark notable user revolt

Netflix rolled the dice two weeks ago, announcing a significant change – and price increase – to its members. Now, it looks like a lot of those members may be planning to cut their ties with the service and embrace the competition.

A new survey from Wedbush Securities of 1,098 people finds that 22 percent of Netflix subscribers say they plan to discontinue their subscription with the company, and substitute its content with a combination of services, including Redbox, Hulu, Amazon’s streaming video initiative and traditional cable pay-per-view.

Read more at Variety’s Technotainment blog

Playcast raises $10 mil in expansion bid

As interest revs up in the cloud gaming world, venture capitalists are doubling down.

Playcast has raised $10 million in a Series B funding round to help it expand its ongoing rollout of services to telecommunications companies and cable television providers. MK Capital, a Chicago/Los Angeles-based venture fund specializing in digital media, and JVP, a leading Israeli venture capital firm focused on media, technology and content, led the round.

Read more in Daily Variety