Do video games have a future at CES?

The cescircus has left town here in Las Vegas. The 100-inch Ultra high definition sets have been packed up. The tens of thousands of unread show dailies have been recycled. And the folks at Razer are back at their headquarters gleefully polishing their Best of CES award.

As the hangovers dim and perspective starts to set in, though, it’s worth taking one look back at CES and seeing what it means – and could mean – for the video game industry as a whole.

Read more at Gamasutra

Six Technology Trends from CES That Will Shape 2013

Every Billboard logoJanuary, the Consumer Electronics Show gives the world a preview of the flood of gadgets heading our way in the coming year and beyond. Some are incredibly silly, while others are complete game changers. All promise to make people’s lives better somehow. We’ve crisscrossed the show floors to come up with six products — each representing larger trends in consumer electronics as they relate to the world of media.

Read more at Billboard

CES 2013 Backbeat: Alicia Keys Headlines Monster Products’ Star-Studded Party

Alicia 2684249-alicia-keys-monster-ces-2-617pxKeys had a busy Wednesday evening. After performing at the People’s Choice Awards, she hopped a plane and headed to Vegas, where she headlined a star-studded party for Monster Products.

As it does every year for its retailer awards at the end of CES, Monster packed in the celebrities with a mix of fans of its product and well known “brand evangelists” to showcase its products for its retail partners and other showgoers.

Read more at Billboard

Costly TVs pave the way for innovations

Being variety-logoan early adopter on the cutting edge of technology has never been cheap. And the new TV sets heading soon to retailers come with a hefty pricetag, making the cost of a state-of-the-art home theater steeper than ever.

For example, Sony’s 84-inch ultra high-definition set that displays in 4K costs $25,000. The more budget-conscious consumer can pick up LG’s 84-inch 4K set for just $19,999.99.

Read more at Daily Variety

The weird and wonderful of CES 2013

There’s variety-logonever any shortage of interesting things at the Consumer Electronics Show, especially devices or software that will transform the way people consume entertainment.

Then there are the oddities. These items may never be a big sales success — and may not even reach store shelves — but they each share a “what the heck is that?” quality that deserves some sort of recognition:

Read more at Daily Variety

50 Cent returns with high-end headphones

While 50cent_ces_lghe first burst onto the scene as a music artist, 50 Cent has quickly become just as influential in the world of business.

The man born as Curtis James Jackson III joined the long line of artists with their own headphone line, founding Studio Mastered Sound (SMS) last year, which has rung up strong sales at retail. At this year’s Consumer Electronics Show, he introduced Street by 50, a new high-end line ranging in price from $180 to $300.

Read more at Daily Variety

CES: Are TV viewers salivating for voice controls?

Voice variety-logocommand may seem like a natural evolution for television, given the popularity of Apple’s Siri on the iPhone. But is it ready for primetime?

Samsung’s ES8000 LED set, the company’s flagship “smart TV” model introduced at last year’s CES, can be turned on simply by talking to it. LG’s Magic Wand remote control uses gesture control. Even accessories like Google TV and Microsoft’s Xbox 360 videogame console let people search for programming by shouting at the devices.

Read more at Daily Variety

CES: Motorhead in gear with headphones

For 2682139-lemmy-motorheadphones-tall-400pxyears, Motorhead has avoided the trend of licensed merchandise, but when a startup headphone manufacturer came calling, the rock band finally joined the club.

“People say we’ve never sold out,” joked the band’s frontman Lemmy in unveiling the new product at the Consumer Electronics Show. “No one ever approached us.”

Read more at Daily Variety

Redbox Instant keeps focus on movies

The variety-logolooming public launch of Redbox Instant by Verizon appears to be an escalation of the war between Redbox and Netflix. But the streaming service plans to focus on movies, rather than a catalog of TV shows, which could put the companies on parallel paths.

“Movies are the core business of Redbox,” said Redbox CEO Shawn Strickland at CES. “TV is increasingly becoming available via multiple sources, and while there is valuable content there, and our strategy could evolve, we didn’t see there was a clear offering to come out around television.”

Read more at Daily Variety