Nintendo’s Fils-Aime outlines Wii U’s dual GamePad plans, value proposition

Nintendo of America head Reggie Fils-Aime tells Gamasutra dual-GamePad Wii U games won’t be around till well after launch — but that’s the least of Nintendo’s concerns as it considers Wii U’s price tag.

While Nintendo relieved fans with last week’s announcement that the Wii U would support two tablet controllers, those hoping to take advantage of that when the system launches will be out of luck.

Nintendo of America president Reggie Fils-Aime tells Gamasutra that while the new console has multi-tablet capabilities, neither Nintendo nor its third-party partners will have any games available that take advantage of that during the launch window.

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Gearbox’s Pitchford on Aliens’ evolution

If Randy Pitchford’s gut is right, you have Gearbox Software co-founder Brian Martel to thank for this summer’s movie Prometheus.

Several years ago, Martel sat down with Ridley Scott to talk about Blade Runner and Alien. As the two discussed the landmark science fiction films, Scott brought out the original, by-then-dust covered storyboards to Alien and began to animatedly discuss the franchise and his love for it.

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Opinion: Why E3 is still relevant

The industry has changed immensely since E3 debuted in the 90s, but critics who say that E3 has lost all relevance are missing the point, says Gamasutra editor-at-large Chris Morris.

There are a lot of people — and media outlets — complaining about E3 these days.

That’s typical around this time each year. The stress of finalizing a schedule and the dread that comes as you realize you’re about to go the better part of a week running at 100mph with little (to no) rest is daunting. But this year, the complaints seem more pointed, with lots of people opening wondering if the show has outlived its usefulness. With all due respect, that’s ridiculous.

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What’s Zynga doing at E3, anyway?

As Zynga prepares to make its first appearance at E3 next month, the developer’s head of partner publishing Rob Dyer explains why the social game company decided to exhibit at the traditionally core-focused show.

Something was missing at last year’s E3.

While there were the usual big announcements and spectacle, the absence of Zynga – which was already one of the largest publishers in the industry – was a shadow hard to ignore. This year, though, the social games maker has reversed course – and will join the industry’s annual circus.

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Facebook’s anemic IPO takes heavy toll on Zynga

Shares of the social media site’s close ally Zynga briefly hit an all time low Friday and closed down precipitously. Editor at large Chris Morris looks at why investors fled – and what might lie ahead.

Through sheer force of will, Facebook managed to avoid closing at below its IPO price during its first day of trading on Wall Street. Unfortunately, that didn’t help its allies.

Zynga saw its stock lose roughly 14 percent of its value Friday – after briefly dropping to an all time low. Shares of the company closed at $7.12 following what can only be called an insane day of trading.

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Zynga stock plunges as Facebook shares begin trading

Not everyone is celebrating the launch of Facebook on Wall Street.

Shares of the social media site’s close ally Zynga nosedived when Facebook shares began trading Friday morning. The company saw its stock price fall more than 14 percent at one point during the day – with Nasdaq having to halt trading of shares twice due to those fluctuations.

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As IPO looms, Facebook confronts its game addiction

Five months after Zynga was center stage on Wall Street, Facebook is readying for its own IPO. And the parallels between the two companies are startling.

At the time (and since it began trading), FarmVille house Zynga was criticized for its over-reliance on the social media site. Investors grumbled that the offering was a dog and pony show — and investors would have no real say in the company’s operations, since the majority of shares remained controlled by Mark Pincus. And the company’s valuation seemed impossibly high.

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EA shares lowest since ’99 – is it now a takeover target?

With EA share prices at their lowest since July 1999, Gamasutra editor-at-large Chris Morris examines if one of game industry’s biggest players is a potential acquisition target.

Electronic Arts has been the rumor mill’s favorite grist for years — but in recent weeks, the company has found itself the subject of even more whispers than usual.

Reports that Nexon was planning a bid for the company proved to be a significant misunderstanding by a major news outlet, but with the company’s revelation Monday that subscribers to Star Wars: The Old Republic are leaving at an alarming pace and that the future earnings outlook is tepid, those takeover talks may be resurrected.

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King.com’s hard-fought battle for Facebook games’ second place

Now in its ninth year, King.com has rapidly become a social gaming powerhouse after pushing its games to Facebook. Amidst rumors of acquisitions and an IPO, Gamasutra speaks with the Bubble Witch house.

While it’s going to be a long while before anyone gets within striking distance of Zynga’s dominance when it comes to social games on Facebook, the fight for the number two position on that site is a fierce one, when it comes to daily active users.

Three companies are battling for the silver medal — Wooga, Electronic Arts and King.com. EA’s held the lead for a while, but earlier this month King.com broke away from the pack, largely on the strength of its Bubble Witch Saga game.

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Opinion: It’s time for Sony to consider a Vita price cut

A rapid price cut helped Nintendo save its 3DS handheld, and maybe it’s time for Sony to do the same with its PlayStation Vita, says Gamasutra editor-at-large Chris Morris.

I feel bad for Kaz Hirai.

The new CEO of Sony has plenty on his plate these days. He recently announced plans to cut 10,000 jobs. He has the mighty task of reviving Sony’s once-powerful brand name. And he’s doing all of this as angry investors and skeptical analysts watch critically from the sidelines.